dhb Aeron Speed short sleeve jersey review

We put dhb's aero offering to the test

Cycling Weekly Verdict

A fairly good aero jersey at a reasonable price, but the short zip means the jersey falls short of being excellent

Reasons to buy
  • +

    Reasonably priced

  • +

    Good sweat wicking properties

  • +

    Good sleeves

  • +

    Aero fit

Reasons to avoid
  • -

    The front zip is too short, which makes the front of the jersey too short

dhb kit always brings quality that surpasses its price tag, and that is true with this aero jersey.

But it’s not perfect. The fit is excellent in some places but misses the mark in others. The sleeves are great: a decent length, stay in place and are very aero. The fit in the body is also very good and clings to the rider in a way that minimises drag — just what you would expect from an aero jersey.

>>> Buyer’s guide to summer cycling jerseys

The front zip is not so good, though. The jersey is an aero cut so comes up higher at the bottom than you’d expect from a less racy garment.

However, this feature has been exaggerated and as such the zip is too short. You would need to ride everywhere on the drops, fully-tucked for the jersey to sit in the right place, so even if you were chewing on your stem in a crit this might still rise up too high.

>>> How to be more aero on your road bike (video)

The wicking material works well and drew sweat away on warm rides. A slight tweak to the fit and this would be a very good jersey indeed.

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Jack Elton-Walters hails from the Isle of Wight, and would be quick to tell anyone that it's his favourite place to ride. He has covered a varied range of topics for Cycling Weekly, producing articles focusing on tech, professional racing as well as cycling culture. He moved on to work for Cyclist Magazine in 2017 where he stayed for four years until going freelance. He now returns to Cycling Weekly from time-to-time to cover racing and write longer features for print and online. He is not responsible for misspelled titles on box outs