A snapped chain is a fairly common mechanical when out riding. Excess dirt grime can comprise chains as can dodgy gear changes. Unfortunately, if you’re not prepared, it can mean a long walk home.

Happily it’s a pretty easy fix and doesn’t require too much time or too many tools. In fact, you’ll only need two pieces of kit to get the bike moving again.

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Firstly, you’ll need a quick link as this is the part that re-connects the chain. Be sure to get the right fit for your bike, though. For example, an 11 speed chain will need an 11 speed link.

Next, you’ll need a chain tool to remove any links that might be broken or stopping you re-joining the chain.

If you haven’t got one, we’d recommend getting one that’s part of a multi-tool as it means less to lug around on a ride.

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So, what’s the actual process? To start with, make sure the chain is still routed correctly. You want to make sure it’s sitting on the smallest sprocket of the cassette and is routed correctly through the jockey wheels of the rear mech.

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Next comes the quick link which replaces a female link of the chain. As a result, you might need to remove a broken female link with the chain tool.

Next, take the quick link and place either pin in the corresponding male link’s hole before pulling them together.

To fix it in place, hack the pedals and it’ll click into place. Then you’re good to go.

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If it’s a bad break, you may need to remove multiple links, especially if a large section of the chain has snapped.

Be warned though, this will mean a reduced chain length which will stop you accessing all your gears. However, fixing it with a quick link should be enough to get you home and then it might be worth replacing the chain altogether.