The Belgian track and road rider will continue to combine the two disciplines as she targets Tokyo 2020 selection

Jolien D’Hoore will move from Mitchelton-Scott to Boels-Dolmans for the 2019 season, it was announced on Wednesday.

The Belgian road and track rider joined Mitchelton-Scott – who currently lead the team rankings in the UCI Women’s WorldTour – for one year, in 2018, having moved on from Wiggle-High5 with whom she enjoyed three seasons.

She’ll join the Dutch team which has been a commanding force in pro women’s cycling for years.

Though the squad has been less dominant through 2018, they have hosted the UCI world champion on the road for the last four years consecutively – with Lizzie Deignan (2015), Amalie Dideriksen (2016), Chantal Blaak (2017) and Anna van der Breggen (2018).

“I like the overall vision of this team, it totally fits my ideas,” says D’Hoore about her latest transfer.

The 28-year-old won stage one of the Women’s Tour this year, as well as stages three and four of the Giro Rosa. The three time Belgian champion is known for her impressive sprint, and her 2018 team mates included the likes of Giro Rosa and La Course winner Annemiek van Vleuten. 

On the track, D’Hoore’s palmares include several national titles, as well as a bronze medal at the 2016 Olympic games, in the omnium.

“Danny Stam first contacted me and after meeting with him, I felt that there was mutual trust and I appreciate the professionality with which the team works,” says D’Hoore about her decision to join the team. “For a while now, Boels-Dolmans has been the number one team in women’s cycling, home to so many champions. I feel honoured that I will be part of the team next year.”

Looking forward towards 2019, she said: “I think we can ride for the win in any race in 2019 and of course I hope to be able to contribute to those wins.”

“I’m massively looking forward to riding the Spring Classics with this strong team,” she added.

D’Hoore will continue to focus on the track alongside road racing, and wants to qualify to race the madison at the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo.

“I feel good combining both disciplines. Both disciplines have a positive influence on each other, so it improves my sprint on the road and my endurance on the track.”