Ineos start delivering one million free bottles of hand sanitiser to NHS hospitals

Dave Brailsford and the cycling squad's staff have been aiding logistical efforts to deliver hand sanitiser to frontline medical staff

(Ineos/Getty)

Chemical giant Ineos has adapted its manufacturing processes to develop up to a million bottles of hand sanitiser, with their cycling team helping to deliver them to NHS hospitals across the UK.

The first deliveries have been made just 10 days after Ineos announced they would begin producing hand sanitiser, which there is a shortage of in the UK and Europe, to aid efforts by the National Health Service to combat the coronavirus pandemic.

Ineos make the individual components that go into hand sanitiser but have begun producing the final product in their Teeside factory, with their plants in Germany and France to soon follow suit.

Team Ineos and Dave Brailsford have been helping with the logistical side of the operation as delivery to 28 hospitals begins and wider distribution will follow when the factories ramp up production.

>>> What happened to Johnny Hoogerland?

"Getting the hand sanitiser into production in just ten days was a huge team effort and Team Ineos, led by Sir Dave Brailsford have made a great contribution alongside the rest of the Ineos family," Jim Ratcliffe said.

"The British government asked industry to help and Ineos was proud to answer the call. Team Ineos is used to moving at speed but ten days from start to finish for three plants already was incredibly tight," Brailsford added. "We are all in this together and I am grateful to everyone in the entire Ineos family for their hands-on approach to getting the job done."

While the sponsors and support staff help with tackling the coronavirus pandemic head-on, the British team's riders have announced plans to keep everyone entertained on their indoor trainers, with the squad's first-ever Zwift event scheduled for Sunday April 12.

Four-time Tour de France winner Chris Foome will be taking part in the group ride alongside his team-mates, which is open to Zwift members of all abilities and taking between 40 minutes to one hour. The Ineos riders will then go head-to-head in a Zwift race.

Jonny Long

Hi. I'm Cycling Weekly's Weekend Editor. I like writing offbeat features and eating too much bread when working out on the road at bike races. I'm 6'0", 26 years old, have a strong hairline and have an adequate amount of savings for someone my age. I'm very single at the minute so if you know anyone, hit me up.


Before joining Cycling Weekly I worked at The Tab, reporting about students evacuating their bowels on nightclub dancefloors and consecrating their love on lecture hall floors. I've also written for Vice, Time Out, and worked freelance for The Telegraph (I know, but I needed the money at the time so let me live).


I also worked for ITV Cycling between 2011-2018 on their Tour de France and Vuelta a España coverage. Sometimes I'd be helping the producers make the programme and other times I'd be getting the lunches. Just in case you were wondering - Phil Liggett and Paul Sherwen had the same ham sandwich every day, it was great.