New Coefficient Road Race handlebar gets around UCI ‘invisible aero-bar’ ban

Innovative computer bridge enables a narrow and stretched out position – while keeping the hands firmly in contact with the bars

Coefficient has released its new Road Race handlebar with a UCI legal design which allows for the adoption of a position similar to the recently banned “invisible aero-bars”.

The position is similar to that adopted by ITU triathletes with their cut down aero bars in draft legal races. But the reason this bar is permitted by the UCI – and those stubby aero bars aren’t – is because the Coefficient Road Race handlebar is one piece. Under Article 1.3.022, the "attachment of any additional handlebar component or extension is prohibited” in road races.

Although it’s called the “Road Race”, the range of potential applications is significantly wider. Anyone who wants to cover more ground (without reaching for a little e-assistance) can benefit from the option of a more aero position. No matter whether that’s for road or gravel rides.

Coefficient Road Race handlebar

Coefficient Road Race handlebar

The out-front bridge – which doubles as a computer mount – allows for a stretched out and narrower position while crucially keeping your hands in contact with the bars, helping to retain control of the bike.

The computer mount is available in options that will work with Garmin, Wahoo, Hammerhead and many more, so compatibility shouldn’t be an issue. Should you want to capture some of your rides, there’s an option to add a GoPro mount underneath.

Coefficient Road Race handlebar

But there’s a lot more to the bar than just the bridge. Flattened tops reduce some of the frontal area of the bar, while 7° of flare to the drops means you can go for a bar that’s narrower at the tops (and therefore more aero) while still retaining a confidence inspiring stance on the drops for descents. A notch in the drops is also said to “provide a more secure and solid grasp for sprinting and descending.”

Unlike some other bars, the sizing is proportional, with the depth of the tops reducing in the smaller sizes, to make it easier to grip with smaller hands.

There’s also a huge range of internal routing ports cut into the bars, meaning most (if not all) lever and frame routing systems should be accommodated.

Pricing comes in at £379.00 / $399 and you can view more details on the US page here or the UK/European page here.

We’ve got a 42cm set currently on review and will update in the coming weeks on how they’ve performed over a mixture of road and gravel riding.

Specs

Widths available: 38cm, 40cm, 42cm, 44cm

Drop: 127mm

Reach: 77mm

Flare:

Stefan Abram
Stefan Abram

Starting off riding mountain bikes on the South Downs way, he soon made the switch the road cycling. Now, he’s come full circle and is back out on the trails, although the flat bars have been swapped for the curly ones of a gravel bike.


Always looking for the next challenge, he’s Everested in under 12 hours and ridden the South Downs Double in sub 20. Although dabbling in racing off-road, on-road and virtually, to date his only significant achievement has been winning the National Single-Speed Cross-Country Mountain Bike Championships in 2019.


Height: 177cm

Weight: 67–69kg