British Cycling to receive £35 million for Paris 2024 Olympics

This is £10 million more than British Cycling received for the Tokyo cycle

British Cycling will receive £35 million funding for the 2024 Paris Olympics, nearly £10 million more than it received for the Tokyo cycle.

The governing body announced they were getting £35,429,000 for the Great Britain Cycling Team to aim for continued success at the 2024 Olympic and Paralympic Games, and that it was “grateful” for the funding “in what has been a difficult year for everybody”.

This increase in funds comes after money was cut for the Tokyo Olympic cycle, when British Cycling received £25,980,427, a reduction of more than £4 million compared to the funds for Rio 2016.

At Rio 2016, Britain continued their impressive run of Olympic success, taking 12 medals in total, compared to 12 in 2012 and 14 in 2008, including six golds. In all three of those Olympic Games, they ranked first and will look to challenge for the top spot once more at the delayed Tokyo Olympics in 2021.

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At the recent European Track Championships GB topped the medal table, taking six golds, three silvers and two bronze medals.

The Tokyo Olympics will see the number of cycling events expanded to 22, an increase of four from 2016.

BMX freestyle is added for the first time, while the madison events will return, having been dropped ahead of the 2012 Games.

“In what has been a difficult year for everybody, we are grateful for the funding which we are set to receive. It will enable us to put in place plans to support riders to realise their dreams and win medals across all the Olympic and Paralympic disciplines,” said Performance Director Stephen Park.

“The money will be invested in supporting the very best of talented British cyclists as we seek to continue to be the top cycling nation at the Olympic and Paralympic Games. That means reinforcing our talent pathways to ensure the legacy of the team can continue beyond 2024.”