Fred Wright 'f**king happy with that' after finishing seventh at Tour of Flanders

Wright becomes only the fourth Briton to finish in the top-10 of the race this century

Fred Wright
(Image credit: Getty)

Fred Wright was exhausted but delighted after finishing seventh at the Tour of Flanders.

The Bahrain-Victorious rider attacked with Ineos Grenadier's Dylan van Baarle with 48km to go, and the duo were eventually joined by race winner Mathieu van der Poel, Tadej Pogačar and Groupama-FDJ's Valentin Madouas. 

Although Van der Poel and Pogačar later counterattacked and Wright was unable to respond, the 22-year-old rode to an impressive seventh, the joint second-best result by a Briton in the men's race this century. Indeed, it has only been bettered by Luke Rowe's fifth in 2016.

A visibly emotional Wright joked to the press afterwards that "I can't really speak; I'm so tired. I think I need some food." But the Londoner did explain his day out front in the first cobbled Monument of the season.

"Oh, man, that's just an elimination race," he said. "I was knew I was happy following Dylan after the first Paterberg, and I knew being ahead for the Koppenberg and Taaienberg was going to help because obviously Mathieu and Tadej are better than me on the climbs.

"For them to then come across and be in the front group of five, I was super, super-happy. But I was on my knees. I was really trying to do as little as possible. I think they all knew I was knackered.

"I thought I would come around a little bit, but as soon as Tadej started riding on the Kwaremont, I had to ride at my own pace. It then just becomes a time trial.

"Man, that was the hardest race I've ever done, but it's special being on the Kwaremont."

>>> Tour of Flanders victor Mathieu van der Poel: 'I think Pogačar was the best man in the race'

Wright, who is still waiting for his maiden professional victory, said that he was unable to respond to Pogačar's acceleration on the Kwaremont. "I had to try my best to follow, but I could feel what my limits were," he said. "I gave my best, and to be in the top-10, I'm f**king happy with that!

"I'm not going to lie, not one bit [did he think he'd get back to Pogačar and Van der Poel]. I said to Dylan [Teuns, team-mate] that he had to go. I was ticking down the kilometres. I swear that was the longest 10kms I've ever done, especially with the headwind. But I'm happy enough."

Asked what the result means to him, he replied: "A f**king lot! Yeah, it's good."

Thank you for reading 5 articles this month* Join now for unlimited access

Enjoy your first month for just £1 / $1 / €1

*Read 5 free articles per month without a subscription

Join now for unlimited access

Try first month for just £1 / $1 / €1

Chris Marshall-Bell
Chris Marshall-Bell

Chris first started writing for Cycling Weekly in 2013 on work experience and has since become a regular name in the magazine and on the website. Reporting from races, long interviews with riders from the peloton and riding features drive his love of writing about all things two wheels.


Probably a bit too obsessed with mountains, he was previously found playing and guiding in the Canadian Rockies, and now mostly lives in the Val d’Aran in the Spanish Pyrenees where he’s a ski instructor in the winter and cycling guide in the summer. He almost certainly holds the record for the most number of interviews conducted from snowy mountains.