DMT Vega cycling shoes review

A great looking pair of shoes, the DMT Vega shoes are very comfortable and lovely and stiff, but that's no reason not to try before you buy...

Cycling Weekly Verdict

Offering good performance and comfort over long rides, these DMT Vega shoes are a solid purchase, but best-suited to those with wider feet.

For
  • +

    Great value for this level of performance

  • +

    Comfortable enough for long rides

Against
  • -

    No half sizes make finding a good fit difficult

The DMT Vega cycling shoes are great looking, and as far as dream shoes go, wallet friendly too.

I found the Vegas to be very comfortable. On a recent 225-mile training weekend from London to Bournemouth (and back!) they never gave me any pain or discomfort, which did surprise me. Usually with any shoe you’d need to work them in, especially a set of Italian-style road racers.

This comfort did not mean any stiffness had been comprised though, and no effort was wasted when riding. However, compared to Shimano’s SH-R321 shoes they lacked a little spark.

The DMT Vega shoes, however, aren’t best suited to me. As a narrow-footed size 42 with a relatively low arch, I struggled to tighten these to fully obtain a secure fit. These will be far better suited to the wider footed cyclist. No half sizes means dropping down a size isn’t really an option and that might limit some.

With a smart dimpled exterior, comfortable inner thanks to DMT’s two material sockliner, a key Velcro spot that holds the tongue in place, as well as a robust heel and toe protectors, you get a solid purchase with the Vega.

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Symon Lewis joined Cycling Weekly as an Editorial Assistant in 2010, he went on to become a Tech Writer in 2014 before being promoted to Tech Editor in 2015 before taking on a role managing Video and Tech in 2019. Lewis discovered cycling via Herne Hill Velodrome, where he was renowned for his prolific performances, and spent two years as a coach at the South London velodrome.