Jérémy Cabot speaks out after Liège-Bastogne-Liège crash: 'I now read comments that are unpleasant at best and completely untrue at worst'

More than 30 riders were involved in a crash on Sunday travelling at 70kmh, with some people attributing blame to Cabot

Jeremy Cabot at the 2022 Tour of the Basque Country
(Image credit: Getty Images)

Jérémy Cabot has responded to assertions that he was the cause of the 70kmh crash at Liège-Bastogne-Liège, which involved more than 30 riders on the descent from Col du Rosier. 

Cabot, who suffered a broken collarbone in two places as a result of the crash, claimed he didn't take ill-considered risks in the race. Sharing his thoughts on Twitter, the TotalEnergies rider suggested the incident was just an unfortunate set of circumstances. 

“In addition to the physical pain, I now read comments that are unpleasant at best and completely untrue at worst,” Cabot said on Twitter (opens in new tab).

“A rider pushed behind me, while I was sitting on the far right of the road in the wheel of the Bora-Hansgrohe riders, there was no room for two in this place, my wheel hit that of the rider in front of me, no time to brake… And chaos… In a quarter of a second.

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“I have never taken ill-considered risks. My teammates, my TotalEnergies team and the people close to me know how much time I spend at the back of the pack to avoid the dangers… I've never been a hothead. I'm never the last to brake. Never."

Cabot continued, suggesting the situation is being blown out of proportion and that his actions weren't intentionally dangerous. 

"I have always had respect for my colleagues in the pack, my family and my health. All the time.

“Please stop the exaggerated interpretations and their spread. I'm sorry for those who fell behind me. I am thinking in particular of Élie [Gesbert] and Julian [Alaphilippe]. Respect to Romain [Bardet] for his gesture towards Julian. I send the strength (that I have left) to those who, like me, are now beginning their recovery. Take care of yourself."

Among the riders caught up in the crash was Julian Alaphilippe, who suffered two broken ribs, a broken scapula and a hemopneumothorax. Images showed the Frenchman lying in the trees at the side of the road, with compatriot Romain Bardet climbing down to help. 

Bardet downplayed his actions in helping Alaphilippe in a social media post (opens in new tab), suggesting anyone would have done the same in such a severe situation. 

The Team DSM rider also mentioned Cabot in the post as he suggested all riders have a responsibility to each other when pushing for position at the front of the bunch, claiming actions at the front can have serious consequences for the riders behind.

Bardet then clarified this message while quote-tweeting (opens in new tab) Cabot's post. 

"Jérémy found himself in the wrong place at the wrong time, far be it from me to pass judgment on who was responsible for the fall, the waves, the speed, the road surface," Bardet said. 

"I'm really sorry that my post was confusing, good luck man."

However, Tom Pidcock seemed to apportion blame to a TotalEnergies rider without specifying which one, claiming he took too many risks moving up through the peloton. 

As the crash happened, Pidcock's momentum saw him flung into a ditch. He later told VeloNews (opens in new tab) he thinks he broke a finger as a result, as he questioned the disregard for safety in the move.

“This DirectEnergies (TotalEnergies, ed.) guy risked his life and risked everyone else’s life when he was coming from behind," Pidcock said. "It was not an acceptable move to be honest."

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Ryan Dabbs

Ryan is a staff writer for Cycling Weekly, having joined the team in September 2021. He first joined Future in December 2020, working across FourFourTwo, Golf Monthly, Rugby World and Advnture's websites, before making his way to cycling. After graduating from Cardiff University with a degree in Journalism and Communications, Ryan earned a NCTJ qualification to further develop as a writer.