May’s tech of the month: Giant TCR Advanced SL 0 Disc, PowerTap P2 pedals and new Zipp finishing kit

The hottest and most interesting kit the tech team will be looking at this month

New Zipp Service Course finishing kit

See more: Silver is back according to Zipp with new component finish

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Zipp has given its Service Course range a lick of classic colour, manufacturing stems, bars and seatposts in silver.

The handlebars are available in four different versions, including the 70 Ergo, 80, 80 Ergo and 70 XPLR. The Ergo models are the shortest and shallowest that Zipp make and feature a flattened ergonomic top, and are available in 38-44cm widths. The 80 ergo is also available in 38-44cm widths but is compatible with a Di2 junction box. The 70 XPLR is a gravel handlebar, featuring a 6cm flare and is available in 42, 44 and 46cm widths.

The silver finish also extends to the Zipp Service Course stem and Zipp Service Course seatpost. All three retain a value price tag, with the bars costing £54, the stem costing £50 and the seatpost costing £50.

PowerTap P2 pedals

Powertap P2 power meter pedals

Michelle’s on-going quest to find the perfect set of power meter pedals has led her to the PowerTap P2 models. Of particular importance is how they stand the test of time and whether the battery case remains waterproof. Power meter pedals are expensive – these PowerTap models cost £845 – but typically represent the best value for those riders that swap bikes often.

While they’re not new, this is the first time they’ve past through the CW office so watch this space for a full review.

Giant TCR Advanced SL 0 Disc

See more: 2021 Giant TCR UK pricing and models announced

Giant’s hugely popular TCR range has been updated and we’ve got our hands on a brand new, top end model. It comes with all the bells and whistles that you’d expect from a bike costing £9499, including SRAM’s eTap AXS groupset, a Quarq power meter, and new Cadex carbon wheels.

On a whole the new bike is lighter, stiffer and more aero than the previous model while still retaining its iconic compact frame design. In his early rides, Rupert has found the bike to be very light (below 7kg) and very responsive to his power inputs. Again, watch this space for a full review.