Petr Vakoc uploads Tour of Britain stage two winning ride to Strava

Petr Vakoc's understated 'Lunch Ride' sees him take 11 KoMs on stage two of the Tour of Britain

Petr Vakoc on the podium after winning Stage 2 of the 2015 Tour of Britain
(Image credit: Watson)

If you had your eye on claiming some Strava KoMs in the Ribble Valley region in the coming weeks you may have to put those ideas firmly back on the shelf after the professional peloton steamed through on stage two of the Tour of Britain.

Winner of the stage between Clitheroe and Colne, Petr Vakoc, was one of many riders to upload their ride to Strava (opens in new tab), claiming 11 KoMs over the 159km route where he sped off the front with around 20km to go.

The profile of the stage was pretty ridiculous: up hill and down dale all day long but Vakoc and co still averaged nearly 25mph for the entire stage.

Screen Shot 2015-09-08 at 10.54.18

After countless hills the route had one more sting in the tail, a climb into the town of Colne which features the excellently named 'Old Farts Lung Buster' segment - less than half a kilometre in length but at six per cent. JLT-Condor's Graham Briggs set the fastest time up that segment, powering up at 24mph in chase of the winner.

Screen Shot 2015-09-08 at 10.54.01

Most stage winners upload their rides to Strava with hyped-up names, but Vakoc stuck with the traditionally understated 'Lunch Ride'. Others, like Tao Geoghegan Hart were slightly more keen to express how difficult it was by naming his ride 'Tour of Britain day 2 - up and down and up and down…'

Stage three features more hills as the race passes into Scotland, with a stage finish at Kelso.

Thank you for reading 5 articles this month* Join now for unlimited access

Enjoy your first month for just £1 / $1 / €1

*Read 5 free articles per month without a subscription

Join now for unlimited access

Try first month for just £1 / $1 / €1

Stuart Clarke is a News Associates trained journalist who has worked for the likes of the British Olympic Associate, British Rowing and the England and Wales Cricket Board, and of course Cycling Weekly. His work at Cycling Weekly has focused upon professional racing, following the World Tour races and its characters.