Orica-GreenEdge withdraw from MPCC

Orica-GreenEdge are the latest WorldTour team to leave the Movement for Credible Cycling (MPCC) although not for the usual reason

Credits : Sport-phot.com/Nicolas Götz

Normally when a team withdraws from the Movement for Credible Cycling (MPCC) they've done something wrong, but Orica-GreenEdge say they are confident that the organisation's initiative are now part the sport's rules and they feel they no longer need to be a part of it.

Only eight WorldTour teams remain in the MPCC (although some have never been a part of it), with LottoNL-Jumbo withdrawing after the organisation's rules stopped George Bennett riding the 2015 Giro d'Italia because of low cortisol levels.

Then, in July, Astana were suspended and then ejected after the team ignored the proposed withdrawal of Lars Boom from the Tour de France after another low cortisol test.

Orica's general manager Shayne Bannan insists his team supports the initiatives of the MPCC, but feels his team no longer needs to be a part of it to promote clean sport.

“We would like to thank all the current and former members of the MPCC for the discussions and initiatives and for sincerely helping the sport move further in the right direction. We fully support the initiatives that have now become an integrated part of the rules of the sport," he said.

"Going onwards, we will be a strong supporter of seeing these and other initiatives being further developed by the official organizations in collaboration with all the other teams and stakeholders of cycling.”

The MPCC was created in 2007 with the aim of defending the idea of clean cycling and adherence of the UCI's code of ethics.

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Stuart Clarke is a News Associates trained journalist who has worked for the likes of the British Olympic Associate, British Rowing and the England and Wales Cricket Board, and of course Cycling Weekly. His work at Cycling Weekly has focused upon professional racing, following the World Tour races and its characters.