Allan Peiper steps away from UAE Team Emirates to focus on his health

The 61-year-old is being treated for cancer and steps down after three years with the squad

Allan Peiper
(Image credit: Getty Images)

Allan Peiper has retired from his role as sports director at UAE Team Emirates so he can focus on his health as he is treated for cancer.

The 61-year-old from Australia joined the team three years ago and has overseen its biggest wins, including both of Tadej Pogačar's Tours de France victories.

Peiper was diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2015, and later in 2019 it was discovered that the cancer had spread to his lung and rib, both requiring extensive chemotherapy.

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Peiper said in a team statement: "The treatment for cancer which I have undergone in the last six years [has] taken a huge toll on me mentally and physically. So much so that I don’t feel at this time that I can do the job like I want.

"The last three years with UAE Team Emirates have been a wonderful experience. The team took me in knowing I had been sick and yet offered me every opportunity, immense support and understanding for which I am utterly grateful."

Peiper first stepped down from his role after Paris-Roubaix in October this year and it was hoped he would be able to continue in an advisory role for the team, but unfortunately, the treatment has left him unable to work at this time.

Team Principal and CEO Mauro Gianetti said: "Though he is stepping back, Allan will always be a member of our team. In these three years we have all learned a lot from him. His professionalism, commitment and knowledge have been invaluable to the team and we are all very grateful and thankful for what he has done.

"We wish him the very best and are all supporting him in his latest fight, that we know he will tackle with the same drive and determination as he always does. Allan’s place in the team will remain for good, and the door is open to him as soon as his health improves."

The team at Cycling Weekly wish Allan Peiper all the best in his recovery.

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Hi, I'm one of Cycling Weekly's content writers for the web team responsible for writing stories on racing, tech, updating evergreen pages as well as the weekly email newsletter. Proud Yorkshireman from the UK's answer to Flanders, Calderdale, go check out the cobbled climbs!


I started watching cycling back in 2010, before all the hype around London 2012 and Bradley Wiggins at the Tour de France. In fact, it was Alberto Contador and Andy Schleck's battle in the fog up the Tourmalet on stage 17 of the Tour de France.


It took me a few more years to get into the journalism side of things, but I had a good idea I wanted to get into cycling journalism by the end of year nine at school and started doing voluntary work soon after. This got me a chance to go to the London Six Days, Tour de Yorkshire and the Tour of Britain to name a few before eventually joining Eurosport's online team while I was at uni, where I studied journalism. Eurosport gave me the opportunity to work at the world championships in Harrogate back in the awful weather.


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