Stop-motion animation of John O'Groats to Land's End ride (video)

Animation by Sentio Space captures the journey and challenges from John O'Groats to Land's End of four friends on a tandem.

If you’re planning a John-O’Groats-to-Land’s-End challenge, this excellent animation from the people at Sentio Space may give you an idea of what you may encounter.

A group of riders from Sentio Space made the journey several years ago, but decided to make the stop-motion animation video for CTC’s #GetBritainCycling campaign.

With stop-motion requiring a photo to be taken for every frame of the video, at nearly five minutes in length this project required 8,000 photos in total.

While the riders weren’t actually helped along by the Loch Ness Monster, or didn’t lose one of their members down a ravine in real life (we assume), the video captures the different stages of the route.

From the rolling hills and rain of Scotland, to the industrial towns and cities of the north, all the way down to the Clifton Suspension Bridge near Bristol and the Eden Project as they neared the end of their journey.

The Get Britain Cycling campaign was debated in Parliament in 2013, with 18 recommendations from an earlier inquiry given an unopposed vote of support.

These recommendations included spending more on cycling, reducing speed limits and improving the quality of roads.

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Stuart Clarke

Stuart Clarke is a News Associates trained journalist who has worked for the likes of the British Olympic Associate, British Rowing and the England and Wales Cricket Board, and of course Cycling Weekly. His work at Cycling Weekly has focused upon professional racing, following the World Tour races and its characters.