Canyon-SRAM unveil bold new kit as they depart from purple and Rapha

New pink-based kit made by Canyon, designed by Ultan Coyle

Canyon-Sram new kit
Alena Amialiusik in the new jersey
(Image credit: ©Tino Pohlmann for Canyon)

Canyon-SRAM have released their new kit for the upcoming 2022 season.

It is lighter than the team's kits have been in recent years, with dark purple being dispensed in favour of pink, blue, red and even green on the sleeves. The jersey has been designed by Ultan Coyle, and will be made by Canyon itself, who replace Rapha as the team's outfitters.

It is still recognisably a Canyon-SRAM kit with its bold colours and eye-catching design. It features meteorological symbols, including a wind gauge around the chest.

The green triangles on the shoulders stand out, and will be sure to separate the German team from other pink/purple kits in the peloton. SD Worx, Human Powered Health and UAE Team ADQ attracted attention for announcing similarly coloured kits.

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Coyle, who has designed the team's kits since it became Canyon-SRAM in 2016, said that the print was called "Astral Burn". It is the first kit that has not been designed by Rapha.

He said: "The print comprises nature’s meteorological displays and their associated human interpretations. The ambition of the print is to capture this phenomenal energy and imbue the athletes that wear it with this sense of power. 

"In addition to this, diamonds were added to specific parts of the design to provide a counter to the visual chaos and serve as flashes to catch the eye.”

Rapha continue to supply men's WorldTour team EF Education-Easypost, but don't currently outfit a team in the Women's WorldTour.

Canyon-SRAM's manager Ronny Lauke said that he was pleased with the commitment shown by Canyon to the team. "Creating such a meaningfully designed piece of cycling kit shows how serious it’s taken by the company."

The team will ride similarly-painted Canyon bikes this season, which incorporate the weather symbols and the green triangles across the distinctive frame.

Canyon-SRAM

(Image credit: ©Tino Pohlmann for Canyon)

Roman Arnold, the founder of Caynon, said: "This is a major step forward for us, and one we are excited to take with such a bold, fresh design. As with our bikes over the years, this is a technical partnership: learnings from the riders will have a big impact on future clothing products we bring to the market.

"We’re proud of our long-term commitment to CANYON//SRAM Racing and are now extra motivated to see what the season ahead brings.”

Alena Amialiusik, who has been with the team since Canyon came on board, said: "After seeing and wearing it, I love the jersey. The ideas behind the design, the colours, the energy it gives me. I feel fresh and light in the new kit. 

"I feel that I can be as strong as a storm, but if something unexpected happens, I am flexible, I can change my direction as fast as the wind and find a new plan. It’s special and unique, which is a lot like our team. I can’t wait to race in it."

The team have brought in Sarah Roy from Team BikeExchange over the winter, as well as Soraya Paladin from Liv Racing. They will be hoping that Kasia Niewiadoma continues to challenge at classics this season.

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Hello, I'm Cycling Weekly's digital staff writer. I like pretending to be part of the great history of cycling writing, and acting like a pseudo-intellectual in general. 


Before joining the team here I wrote for Procycling for almost two years, interviewing riders and writing about racing. My favourite event is Strade Bianche, but I haven't quite made it to the Piazza del Campo just yet.


Prior to covering the sport of cycling, I wrote about ecclesiastical matters for the Church Times and politics for Business Insider. I have degrees in history and journalism.