London cyclists have held a second protest in the space of a week outside the Bank of England, days after a 26-year-old woman became the eighth rider to die on London’s streets this year.

Organised by campaign group Stop Killing Cyclists, hundreds of cyclists staged a die-in at the busy junction on Monday evening in a protest which also remembered 60-year-old Clifton James, who died while cycling in Harrow last weekend.

Donnachadh McCarthy, of Stop Killing Cyclists, told the Evening Standard: “Tonight cyclists have sent London’s Mayor a huge dignified silent roar from the heart of the City saying ‘close this murderous junction and spend 10 per cent of the transport budget on cyclist safety’.”

Six of the eight riders who have died on London roads this year have been women, while seven have involved collisions with lorries.

>>> Why are lorries responsible for so many cyclist deaths?

Coincidentally, Monday’s protest came on a day when two more female cyclists were involved in collisions with lorries – one whom was rushed to hospital after the accident near Blackfriars Bridge.

Protester Ollie Cartmell, 26, told the Standard: “The indifference towards the cycling deaths is such a sad thing.

“It’s quite a common occurrence but nothing seems to change, it’s just met with indifference. It just seems London is quite a long way behind psychologically, educationally, structurally and even just the way they think about cycling.

>>> Parliamentary cycling head would support ban on lorries at peak time

“This junction is normally a mess. I avoid it on purpose and I would say I’m quite a confident cyclist. It’s unnecessarily poor, but the thing is there are so many junctions like this in London.”

 

  • It’s quite an common incidence however nothing appears to alter, it’s simply met with indifference. It simply appears London is kind of an extended means behind psychologically, educationally, structurally and even simply the means they rely on sport…